Canadian Pacific Hauls One Long Load Of Track!

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Canadian Pacific Hauls One Long Load Of Track! | Train Fanatics Videos
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It is so sad when a line gets torn up…Chalk River Subdivision the latest victim!

Photos showing the aftermath of tearing up the line of the Chalk River Subdivision at Sand Point in the Ottawa Valley in Ontario, Canada, make us wonder what they do with all of the steel rails.

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The Chalk River subdivision began service in 1872 to around 2009, and was discontinued due to the globalization that killed many small manufacturing business that were dependent on the line to get their goods to market.

29 seconds into this clip shows the continuous welded rails being hauled away on flatcars by Canadian Pacific Railroad.

The rails seemingly have no breaks in them and look like one continuous welded rail!

The line that was torn up stretched for about 186 miles, so we know that had to have cut the rails to put them on the flat cars. But how long can one rail be in order to haul it as shown in this clip?

Continuous welded rail (CWR) has been around for quite a while and was first used in Germany in 1924. The U.S. adopted its use in 1930.

Continuous welded rail (CWR) allows: smoother rides, higher speeds, and lower maintenance costs.

Let us know what you think about the loading and hauling of all of this steel. How long are the sections?

NOTE: the video is silent for the first 26 seconds!

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